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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

4 edition of MTBE concentrations in ground water in Pennsylvania found in the catalog.

MTBE concentrations in ground water in Pennsylvania

Steven D. McAuley

MTBE concentrations in ground water in Pennsylvania

by Steven D. McAuley

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Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Geological Survey, Branch of Information Services [distributor] in New Cumberland, Pa, Denver, Colo .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Groundwater -- Pollution -- Pennsylvania,
  • Butyl methyl ether -- Environmental aspects -- Pennsylvania

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Steven D. McAuley ; in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
    SeriesWater-resources investigations report -- 03-4201
    ContributionsPennsylvania. Dept. of Environmental Protection, Geological Survey (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 44 p. :
    Number of Pages44
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13633101M
    OCLC/WorldCa54357409

    National Ground Water Association Petroleum Conference in Anaheim, California neatly sums it up: “Many looked at 74 sites in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Florida, Indi- ference in the relative concentrations of TBA and MTBE in groundwater between the sites where MTBE biodegradation was apparent and. In wells downgradient of the release area, MTBE was detected before benzene, reflecting a chromatographic-like separation of these compounds in the direction of ground-water flow. Higher concentrations of MTBE and benzene were measured in the deeper sampling ports of multilevel sampling wells located near the release area, and also up to

    "Even when concentrations of VOCs in groundwater are low compared to regulatory concentration limits, it is critical to know the source. If the VOCs originate from a point source(s), concentrations in groundwater could potentially increase over time to levels of concern as groundwater plumes evolve, whereas if the atmosphere is the source, then groundwater concentrations would be expected to. (EPA has not regulated MTBE, but has advised people not to drink water with MTBE concentrations greater than 20 to 40 parts per billion). The GAO report notes that this extent of MTBE contamination occurred even though only certain communities in about one-third of the states use gasoline with MTBE as required under the Clean Air Act.

    Methyl t-Butyl Ether (MtBE): Health Information Summary. Methyl tertiary -butyl ether (MtBE) is a colorless, synthetically produced liquid. Most people can smell MtBE in water at relatively low concentrations. Depending on the level in water, the odor has been described as “sweet, solvent-like, alcohol, or turpentine.”File Size: 57KB. A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE OCCURRENCE AND POSSIBLE SOURCES OF MTBE IN GROUND WATER OF THE UNITED STATES, By Paul J. Squillace, John S. Zogorski, William G. Wilber, anofCurtis V. Price ABSTRACT The Clean Air Act Amendments require fuel oxygenates to be added to gasoline used in someCited by:


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MTBE concentrations in ground water in Pennsylvania by Steven D. McAuley Download PDF EPUB FB2

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MTBE Concentrations in Ground Water in Pennsylvania by Steven D. McAuley Water-Resources Investigations Report In cooperation with the PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION New Cumberland, Pennsylvania File Size: 5MB.

Get this from a library. MTBE concentrations in ground water in Pennsylvania. [Steven D McAuley; Pennsylvania. Department of Environmental Protection.; Geological Survey (U.S.)]. The distribution, concentrations, and detection frequency of methyl tert-butyl-ether (MTBE), a gasoline additive used in reformulated gasoline to improve air quality, were characterized in Pennsylvania's ground water.

Two sources of MTBE in ground water, the atmosphere and storage-tank release sites, were examined. An analysis of atmospheric MTBE concentrations shows that MTBE detections (MTBE.

MTBE is a colorless liquid. Most people can smell MTBE in water at low concentrations. MTBE has been detected in groundwater in the US. MTBE at low levels can make drinking water supplies non-drinkable due to its offensive taste and odor.

EPA has not set a national standard for MTBE. Summary Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a regulated drinking water contaminant with an established Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for drinking water at 13 µg/L and a Secondary Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) at 5 µg/L.

Methyl Tertiary-Butyl Ether (MTBE) Guideline The aesthetic objective (AO) for methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in drinking water is mg/L (15 µg/L). This AO is the odour threshold of MTBE.

Executive summary MTBE has been used as a common additive in gasoline, to help improve combustion and reduce exhaust emissions. Statewide Health Standards Revised MCLs and HALs. Revisions to these EPA standards affect both the groundwater MSC for a substance as well as the soil-to-groundwater numeric value, which is based on the groundwater MSC and is used to calculate the statewide health MSC for soils.

in the Pennsylvania Bulletin. These standards became. Clean Up and Treatment How MTBE-contaminated soil and groundwater can be cleaned up.

Recommendations and Actions Recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel and other actions EPA is taking to address concerns about MTBE. Local Information Find out whom to contact in your area for more information on MTBE in drinking water. The MTBE Remediation Handbook is a comprehensive and up-to date compendium of knowledge of the technology and risk management of MTBE contamination.

This handbook examines the remediation of MTBE in existing spills: exploring the myths which act as impediments to successful clean-up techniques, and offering effective solutions. Experience in the last decade has shown that prompt source control Reviews: 1. Use of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) As A Gasoline Additive In this report to the Connecticut General Assembly on the use of MTBE, the Department of Environmental Protection outlines five recommendations for dealing with MTBE as a gasoline additive.

Methyl tert-butyl ether is a gasoline additive used as an oxygenate and to raise the octane number. Its use has declined in the United States in response to environmental and health concerns.

It has polluted groundwater due to MTBE-containing gasoline being spilled or leaked at gas stations. MTBE spreads more easily underground than other gasoline components due to its higher solubility in water. Cost estimates for removing MTBE from groundwater.

Temporal changes in methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) concentrations in groundwater were evaluated in the northeastern United States, an area of the nation with widespread low-level detections of MtBE based on a national survey of wells selected to represent ambient conditions.

MtBE use in the U.S. peaked in and was largely discontinued by. The contamination of groundwater by MTBE is extensive in the United States. The EPA reports, citing a study by Chevron, that MTBE concentrations exceeded μg L –1 in 47% of California sites surveyed, 63% of Texas sites surveyed, and 81% of 41 Maryland sites surveyed.

23, µg/L. The concentrations of MTBE in ground water from eight urban areas are shown in figure 3. When detected, the median concentration of MTBE was µg/L. MTBE was detected in shallow ground water in all eight urban land-use studies but was detected in ground water from only 3 of 20 agricultural areas studied.

For the urbanCited by: technologies for MTBE and TBA in groundwater; it does not cover remediation of other media such as soil, air, or nonaqueous-phase liquid. It is intended for readers who have a technical background but not necessarily extensive remediation experience. MTBE has been blended with gasoline in the United States sinceinitially as an octane.

Pulses, which may be caused by the infiltra-tion of rain water or rising ground-water levels, may necessitate frequent groundwater sampling to determine actual MTBE concentrations and lev-els of risk to down-gradient receptors.

The frequency of sampling should be determined based on the velocity of the groundwater and the number of monitoring. Atmospheric methyl tert‐butyl ether (MTBE) concentrations in southern New Jersey generally exceeded concentrations in samples taken from the unsaturated zone.

A simple unsaturated zone transport model indicates that MTBE degradation can explain the attenuation with half‐lives from a Cited by: MTBE concentrations upgradient from plots A and B initially varied temporally from to 6 mg MTBE/L.

Six months after treatment began, MTBE concentrations in monitoring wells downgradient from the injection bed decreased substantially in the shallow zone of the groundwater in plots A and B, thus even in the absence of the inoculated strain PM1.

Abstract. Shipping list no.: es bibliographical references (p. ).Mode of access: Internet. MTBE and Gasoline Hydrocarbons in Ground Water of the United States Article Literature Review in Ground Water 43(4) July with Reads How we measure 'reads'.Temporal changes in methyl tert-butyl ether (MtBE) concentrations in groundwater were evaluated in the northeastern United States, an area of the nation with widespread low-level detections of MtBE based on a national survey of wells selected to represent ambient use in the U.S.

peaked in and was largely discontinued by Six well networks, each representing specific Cited by: 8.In methyl tertiary-butyl ether (also known as methyl t-butyl ether or MTBE), one carbon atom is that of a methyl group, -CH3, and the other is the central atom of a tertiary butyl group, -C(CH3)3.

At room temperature, MTBE is a volatile, flammable, and colorless liquid that is highly soluble in water and MTBE is 28 times more soluble than benzene.